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Cessna Conquest crashes near Denton, TX

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One person is dead after a small aircraft crashed Wednesday night just south of Argyle in Denton County, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety. The twin-engine Cessna plane reportedly went down while on approach to the Denton Municipal Airport. Officials said Denton County emergency dispatchers received several calls at about 9 p.m. from residents hearing a low-flying plane, adding it is unusual to hear that in this area. (www.nbcdfw.com) المزيد...

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bovineone
Jeff Lawson 1
ASN incident page -- http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=173581

Flight track for N441TG -- http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N441TG/history/20150205/0020Z/KBDH/KDTO
oleipelt
oleipelt 1
"William Graves was the only one onboard the plane"....."the identity of the pilot has not been released."
linbb
linbb 1
Well they didn't want to identify Auto in it I guess. LOL
preacher1
preacher1 1
I just gots some questions. Now, if they heard him over Argyle, he was South of KDTO and lining up for approach and from the South would have been lining up on 36. Now, Argyle is only 7-8 miles South of Denton so he would have been fairly low anyway but the other thing, the incident report says "While on approach to Denton Municipal Airport (KDTO), in Denton, Texas, the airplane impacted terrain east of the airport. The airplane was destroyed by impact and partially consumed by the post impact fire. The sole pilot onboard received fatal injuries. To boot, it says he impacted terrain East of the airport. Unless they are talking about a problem and CFIT, that land around there is basically flat. Something is not right here.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
I don't have too many answers but he was guess what, brand new in type! 6-Jan-2015 KODIE ACQUISITIONS LLC CONCORD MA The registration date. The airplane, from all the pictures and video I have seen did not burn! The airframe is in more or less one piece and could not possibly have looked like it does without hitting the ground in a deep stall. He was probably maneuvering for the GPS 36 approach which involves two, count em, two virtually 90 degree turns. He was too slow for the first one let alone the second to the final approach course. The morons designing these GPS approaches obviously ain't never flown an approach of any type! The more you have to maneuver when slow the more it will catch the at or slightly behind the power curve! And I mean that literally. And I think I said this once, if you just bought an airplane that is above your pay grade pilot wise, hire a pro to ghost write for a few hours and live to tell the tale!
BaronG58
BaronG58 2
Your right...the plane did not burn...it did leak fuel. Agree on stall. Plane looks like it pancaked in. Pilot had just recently purchased this plane. He was a seasoned pilot with 28 yrs experience. Had a beautiful family..wife and five kids. Successful business man...owned 94 Pizza Huts. Sad.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Agreed on the pilot and family, always a terribly sad situation. I live in the area and have heard and read the bios on the local news. Classic description of a dynamic guy who would own, fly and justify the use of a company airplane. Mea culpa on the rant about approach designers, as there is no way to design approaches without course reversals. I guess my real point is the consequences of the 90 degree turn to final that is built into virtually all of these GPS approaches. Us old guys would scream bloody murder at an approach controller for a 90 degree vector to the localizer. Even when you see it coming, and you should, it is not what most of us grew up with. VFR pattern, yes, old approach plates or vectors to the final approach course, no. For the guy who is not quite ahead of his airplane yet the tendency is to overshoot the final approach course. Next comes a little more bank, then maybe a little bottom rudder and bang, where did the airspeed go and why is that horn making so much noise? This accident displays the classic signatures. I suspect the turn to final was the culprit, not as I had earlier stated, the first. It occurs all the way up the food chain, from VFR C150's on up. And I have yet to strap on a new airplane type, especially one that represents a substantial upgrade in performance, and consider myself truly ahead of it for the first few hours, especially hard IFR. Food for thought as the events of the accident are speculation on my part, the concepts are not.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Easiest transition I ever made was 757 to 767, but they were designed that way and it only took about a hour or little better to get ahold of it. The CRJ's/ERJ's were fun as they were so much faster. Then along came the ATR's and they were really a handful.
BaronG58
BaronG58 1
You live in the area,so doI. Hey neighbor?
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Greetings from far north Dallas.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Well, I didn't pull the plates and look until now and see what you are talking about. Where that terrain between WOBOS and ZITAG come from? I thought that was flat country around there
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
It looks deceptively flat from the air but there are some small hills in that area that are just low rollers.
preacher1
preacher1 1
10- 4, flew in down there several times but haven't driven it in about 3-4 years when we drove down for a race. Now, that approach , starting at WOBOS, is about 2.5 off the runway. Where exactly did he go down in relation to that.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
It hit the ground in the Argyle city limits between Hwy. 377 and stonecrest road. Just slightly east of the centerline and probably 5 or 6 miles south of the runway end. That is north of WOBOS so he should have been almost or at the FAF.
preacher1
preacher1 1
And in the FWIW column, Argyle would be a little East of the approach for 36 and would account for some saying they didn't hear planes over there that often.
ltullos
Larry Tullos 1
I'm about 6 mi SE of crash site & was listening to emergency responders at the time. It took them about 45+ minutes to locate the crash and first one to report said pilot was unresponsive, bleeding from nose. From photos of wreckage, it appears to have come in flat and cabin appears to be undamaged so I thought this would have been survivable. Also since there was fuel on-board (responders reported it was fuel soaked around it) and no fire, it would seem to indicate he shut off systems preparing for emergency. I think there was light drizzle & some fog at the time which hindered responders in locating the crash site. Temps were in low 40s at the time, so is there a chance icing could have been a factor?

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